Invisible Electric Fence For Dogs Ladner BC

TheFreedomFence.com now offers installation, repair and servicing of All Brands of pet and dog fence systems in Ladner BC and Western Canada. Choosing the right underground dog fence for your dog can be confusing because of the wide variety of electronic pet fences available. A quality in-ground dog fence is sold by Pet Stop®, PetSafe®, Pet Guardian®, Invisible Fence ™ ®, DogWatch®, Dog Guard®, Innotek®, and DogTek® and comes in different styles for different types of dogs and are ideal for climate found in and around Ladner BC.

Invisible Electric Dog Fence

 

Even though an invisible, underground, wireless or other electric dog fence systems cannot be seen or touched, they do a fairly good job in keeping your dog safe within the exterior areas of your demarcated property. These unique dog containment systems are designed to prevent your dog from straying, being a nuisance to your neighbors and staying safe from accidents or attacks by other animals. It is not only an innovative way to keep your dog safe, but will also save you a lot of money compared to installing a traditional fence in Ladner BC. Moreover, they will also give your home and garden a cleaner, more aesthetic look.

If you find that a traditional fence is beyond your budget, or if such a fence contravenes rules laid down by your neighborhood community, then installing any type of invisible dog fencing system would be the best option. There are some highly effective fences available today, so you can easily choose one that suits your needs and budget.

One of the most popular options available today is the “radio electric” dog fence. It is designed for the sole purpose of deterring your dog from moving out of the demarcated areas of your Ladner BC property or acreage. The invisible dog fence involves the use of two main components – a transmitter and a receiver (radio collar).

Small Dog Fence

 

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How the Dog Fences Works?

The fence has an electric wire fitted with a transmitter and installed underground all around the borders of your acreage or Ladner BC property. This fence system works by giving out a beeping signal which is received by your dog’s radio collar, each time it (the dog) gets too close to the fence. If your dog continues to ignore the signals, a mild static shock is delivered via its collar to stop it from crossing the fence. However, the shock frequency can be adjusted to limit fear or harm to your dog.

 

Are Electronic Dog Fences Legal in Ladner BC?

Invisible Dog Fence Collars For Sale

 

My dog used to be a darter. One of those canines that would see an opening and take off. He's been hit by a car twice now, neither really that bad, and has been lost more times than I can count. Even at the old home, where a fence has existed for years, the 100 pound lab would simply hop the thing and joy ride if no one was around. It had gotten to the point that I couldn't even let him outside unless he was on a leash or tied to something.

Just a couple months ago, I moved in to a new house with a huge back yard. The yard had a great garden on the interior, too. And to my pleasant surprise, the entire perimeter was wired for one of those underground electric dog fences. The former owner told me that the fence had been installed by a local company, and worked great for his fifteen year old standard poodle. Right before I moved in, he taught me how to use the electric fence, and I looked forward to allowing my dog to run free in the huge yard with no chance of escape.

The fence initially worked wonderfully. The minute my dog got that first hard shock, he wouldn't go near the perimeter of the yard. For a good week, he played around the rest of the property while I tended to my new garden. In this week, my dog never more than edged toward the boundary, and this allowed me to feel safe and secure without having to watch his every move.

Unfortunately, that first week was the exception. After that, I noticed problem after problem with my electric fence. First, the act of keeping my dog enclosed in this back yard seemed to make him more mischievous inside the boundaries, and I came down one morning to find my newly-improved garden destroyed. This caused me to give up on my gardening for the time.

Second, the dog suddenly gained the skill to break free from the boundaries. Even with me watching, he would get a good running start, take off toward the perimeter, absorb the shock and just bust right through the thing. This caused me to turn the power up to high, which increased the shock level to a seemingly unbearable strength, and I could barely stand to watch my dog attempt to break it.

However, shortly thereafter my intelligent canine found a way to break out again anyway. He would approach the perimeter, just close enough to hear the warning tone sounding. Then he would simply sit there and let the thing beep until the battery died, an act that allowed him to run through the boundaries. Isn't the intelligence of dogs amazing? As much as I wanted to punish him for that, I was actually pretty proud that he was smart enough to figure that one out. Soon, I had no way of stopping the dog from conquering the electric fence.

I called the local installation company to see if they could help. Apparently, most companies are now referring to the product as a "containment system." I guess "electric fence" is a little less politically correct. They recommended an entire new setup, including new and upgraded system, thicker wire, and a new wire setup around the garden area, what they referred to as "expert installation." All in all, the cost for products and installation was well over two thousand dollars, which was way beyond my budget.

On the verge of giving up, I ran a couple Internet searches and found some companies selling these containment systems online at a fraction of the cost I was quoted. I called a couple customer service departments and eventually gathered the information I needed. As it turns out, I didn't even need to reinstall the system. The wire that was currently in the ground would work with any new fence I purchased.

And the new systems had everything I needed. The model I chose has a great feature called "Run Through Prevention," which basically prevents hard headed dogs like mine from running through the fence by creating a zone of increasing stimulation as the dog gets closer and closer to the boundary. I've also found this feature to be more humane, as it doesn't just hit my dog with one hard shock, and doesn't just punish him for accidentally wandering into the zone. Instead, the level of shock he receives is only increased if he continues toward the boundary.

In addition, the new containment systems have this feature called anti-drain prevention which was created for dogs like mine that would sit in the warning zone until the warning tone caused the battery to die. When my dog attempted to linger in the warning area, he received a warning shock after a couple seconds, which continued until he moved out of the area.

And as for the garden, that part was hardly "expert installation." A customer service representative talked me through a simple installation process, which consisted of me digging up just a foot of wire, splicing it and adding another wire which traveled out to my centered garden, around the beds, and back to the original splice in the wire. And what's even better, I was instructed to twist the two wires going to and from the garden, a practice that cancels the signal, meaning the only active part of the wire was the section encircling the garden. Therefore, my dog can run anywhere around the garden until he comes within five feet, and that means no more eating my flowers!

 

Advantages and Disadvantages of the Invisible Dog Fence

Fenceless Dog Containment

 

If you are interested in introducing your dog to the in-ground fence correction, then your dog must have already mastered the first step: Introducing Your Dog to the Fence.  By now your dog should have learned its boundaries and boundary markers, meaning it is time to start the correctional training.  The first thing you need to do is to turn on the levels of correction either from the collar, transmitter, or by removing any masking tape you may have used while training your dog what to do when it hears the "beep".  Next, place the collar on your tight snuggly to ensure that contact is made to your dog when correction is needed.  A good rule of thumb is make the collar tight while leaving enough room to fit two fingers between the collar and your dog's neck.

It is now time to set the level of correction needed for your pet. This will vary from one dog to the next but generally you will want to place small and compliant dogs on the medium-low setting, for a medium sized dog set the correction to medium-high, and for a large or stubborn dog, place the correction setting to high.

When setting the correction level, many owners set the collar on a low setting because they do not want to hurt their beloved animal. However, this can actually have an adverse affect on your. If the correction level is set too low, your dog will learn that the correction is not that bad and will not mind overstepping its boundaries. If you set the collar to a higher setting, your dog may experience some discomfort a few times but they will quickly learn to stay away from the boundary. Under no circumstances should your dog be able to cross the boundary line, if they are allowed to cross the line, they may learn that the short duration of the correction may be worth it to leave the boundary once they see that there is no correction once they cross the boundary. It is for this reason that we recommend setting the collar to a higher setting.

While you are training your dog, if it does not seem to react to the correction, you may have the correction level set too low. Try turning up the correction and look for a greater reaction from your dog. If you feel that your correction is set high, check to make sure that the contacts are making a clean connection to your dogs neck. This could involve checking to make sure that the collar is tight enough or trimming your dogs fur if they have a thick coat.

Once your dog's collar is on correctly, remember to start the training session with some play time with your pet.  Then put your dog on a long leash, get close to the boundary (about a yard away) and let your dog wander. During this step, do not lure your dog over the boundary, let your dog naturally wander and explore it on their own; this may take a few minutes but will be effective. Once your dog's collar starts beeping, continue to let them wander over the boundary line and let your dog experience the correction.  Although it may take a second or two, you will notice when your dog is shocked as it will visibly react and recoil. Once this happens, quickly pull your dog back into the safe area of your yard saying "no" three or four times and then praise your dog once it is safely back in your yard.

Once your dog receives a correction, do not comfort your dog or panic. Remember, the correction is more surprising to your dog than it is painful. Your dog looks up to you for guidance, if you act like the correction is no big deal your dog will learn that is a normal consequence for crossing the boundary. Remember to praise your dog anytime it comes close to the boundaries and then stops or turns its back to the flags. This means that your dog is associating the boundary and the beeps with consequences and is choosing to stay in the safe area of the yard. Remember to play with your dog at the end of the training session to reaffirm that the yard is a good and safe place for your dog.

While training your dog, do not let them get corrected more than once per training session. You do not want your dog to have an unpleasant training experience. Should your dog get shocked, turn off the correction levels and continue with training in the same fashion as step one. Repeat this training step 3 or 4 times a day for about a week. If, for some reason your does not seem get the point, go back to the first step in the process as laid out.


http://thefreedomfence.com/british-columbia/ – TheFreedomFence.com now offers installation, repair and servicing of All Brands of pet and dog fence systems in Ladner BC. WE PROUDLY SERVICE ALL BRANDS OF ELECTRIC FENCE SYSTEMS LIKE: Pet Stop®, PetSafe®, Pet Guardian®, Invisible Fence ™ ®, DogWatch® and Dog Guard®.